About the Researchers

Lori Kogan
Lori Kogan, PhD

Lori Kogan, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences of Colorado State University Veterinarian Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She is the editor of the American Psychological Association’s Human Animal Interaction Section’s Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin. Dr. Kogan has published numerous journal articles, co-edited several books (including Pet Loss, Grief, and Therapeutic Interventions: Practitioners Navigating the Human-Animal Bond and Clinician's Guide to Treating Companion Animal Issues: Addressing Human-Animal Interaction) and given invited presentations on topics related to human animal interactions in both psychology and veterinary medicine venues. She is currently engaged in several research projects pertaining to the intersection of the human animal bond and veterinary medicine. She is passionate about animal welfare, and as part of her efforts in this area, has studied topics related to animal pain. In her quest to assess alternatives to traditional medicine for pets, she has published several papers related to the use of CBD in companion animals and dog CBD information.

Phyllis Erdman, Ph.D.
Phyllis Erdman, Ph.D.

Phyllis Erdman, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Counseling Psychology Program and is Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Education at Washington State University. Dr. Erdman has conducted research in parent/child relationships and human-animal interaction looking at the effectiveness of equine-facilitated activities (particularly in adolescent populations) and their impact on social-emotional development. Dr. Erdman serves as Past Chair of the Human-Animal Interaction Section of Division 17, and is committed to promoting research that documents evidence-based approaches for animal interventions, as well as the interdisciplinary nature of the field of human-animal interactions.

Wendy Packman, JD, PhD
Wendy Packman, JD, PhD

Wendy Packman, JD, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Palo Alto University. Dr. Packman has studied, presented and written extensively on sibling bereavement and continuing bonds, the impact of a child’s death on parents, and the psychological sequellae of pet loss. She is the primary investigator of an international cross-cultural study examining the use of continuing bonds following a pet’s death.

Dr. Cori Bussolari
Dr. Cori Bussolari

Dr. Cori Bussolari is an Associate Professor at the University of San Francisco in the Counseling Psychology Department. Her scholarly and clinical passions are in the areas of disenfranchised grief, trauma, and the development of positive, lifelong coping behaviors. Cori’s most current research focus is centered around the human/animal connection during the time of COVID-19, as well as companion animal loss, grief, and self-compassion. In addition to her work at USF, Cori is a licensed, practicing psychologist and credentialed school psychologist. For most of her professional clinical career, she has worked with individuals and families coping with illness, death, or a significant life transition, and she is also an active consultant for hospitals, schools and community mental health clinics. She joyfully spends her spare time hiking with her (semi-hairless) dog, Stella, or sitting in the sun with her (hairless) cat, Googgie.

Dr. Jen Currin-McCulloch
Dr. Jen Currin-McCulloch

Dr. Jen Currin-McCulloch is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Colorado State University.  Her clinical and research expertise center on individuals’ psychosocial adaptation to loss. Jen’s passion for human-animal bonds started when she accompanied her father to work in his veterinary clinic and continued to flourish while working alongside volunteers in an animal assisted therapy program for hospitalized children and adults. Animal assisted therapy emerged as instrumental in nurturing emotional and social bonds, and provided an outlet for coping through tremendous challenge and uncertainty. These experiences drove Jen to further her work in studying the role of companion animals in coping with uncertainty, grief and loss, such as those that have erupted from the COVID-19 pandemic. In her free time, Jen loves to explore the mountains with her lab rescue, Chica.